Accomodating differences

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Many people with disabilities use a service animal in order to fully participate in everyday life.Dogs can be trained to perform many important tasks to assist people with disabilities, such as providing stability for a person who has difficulty walking, picking up items for a person who uses a wheelchair, preventing a child with autism from wandering away, or alerting a person who has hearing loss when someone is approaching from behind.

A person with depression may have a dog that is trained to remind her to take her medication.You can avoid all of this by using the Interest-Based Relational (IBR) approach.Roger Fisher and William Ury developed the IBR approach and published it in their 1981 book, "Getting to Yes." They argue that you should resolve conflicts by separating people and their emotions from the problem.This publication provides guidance on the ADA's service animal provisions and should be read in conjunction with the publication ADA Revised Requirements: Service Animals. Under the ADA, a service animal is defined as a dog that has been individually trained to do work or perform tasks for an individual with a disability.The task(s) performed by the dog must be directly related to the person's disability. The dog must be trained to take a specific action when needed to assist the person with a disability.

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